tangledguardians:

RotG + Colorful scenery 

Requested by Anonymous and the-unofficial-disney-princess

(Source: snowydragons, via redwesteinde)

handpickedhappiness:

thevoxbox:

charlesoberonn:

giftvvrap:

will you marry me = a marriage proposal
will, you, Mary, me = a foursome proposal

Will you, Mary me = Cavewoman Mary helps Will recover from his Amnesia

Will, you marry me. = Will’s time-traveling partner

And people keep trying to tell me that punctuation isn’t important

(via toughtink)

destroy-me-in-the-tardis:

potterhead:

discodancerdonna:

Doublju Mens Button Pointed Zipper Jacket

fuuuuuuuuck

WHY DON’T GUYS WEAR THIS AT MY SCHOOL INSTEAD OF THAT STUPID HOLLISTER SHIT OMG

(Source: disco-dancer-donna, via xxphuckin-wickedxx)

Tags: fashion

stultiloquentia:

giandujakiss:

ryeisenberg:

upworthy:

The Music Industry Asked Him To Change 1 Word In His Songs. His Response Is Pitch Perfect.

So many notes! :-D

for my birthday, i want someone to make this into a meta vid about fandom, slash shipping, and industry responses

Oh my god, make it happen, fandom.  For giandujakiss!

(via loving-that-officey-feel)

Tags: music

aliasofwestgate:

justira:

Reblogging not just because special effects are cool but because body doubles, stunt doubles, acting doubles, talent doubles — all the people whose faces we’re not supposed to see but whose bodies make movies and tv shows possible — these people need and deserve more recognition. We see their bodies onscreen, delight in the shape and motion of those bodies, but even as we pick apart everything else that goes on both on and behind the screen, I just don’t see the people who are those bodies getting the love and recognition they deserve.

We’re coming to love and recognize actors who work in full-body makeup/costumes, such as Andy Serkis, or actors whose entire performances, or large chunks thereof, are motion captured or digitized (lately sometimes also Andy Serkis!). But people like Leander Deeny play an enormous part in making characters such as Steve Rogers come to life, too. Body language is a huge part of a performance and of characterization. For characters/series with a lot of action, a stunt person can have a huge influence on how we read and interpret a character, such as the influence Heidi Moneymaker has had on the style and choreography of Black Widow’s signature fighting style. Talent doubles breathe believability and discipline-specific nuance into demanding storylines.

Actors are creative people themselves, and incredibly important in building the characters we see onscreen. But if we agree that they’re more than dancing monkeys who just do whatever the directors/writers say, then we have to agree that doubles are more than that, too. Doubles make creative decisions too, and often form strong, mutually supportive relationship with actors.

image image

Image 1: “I would like to thank Kathryn Alexandre, the most generous actor I’ve ever worked opposite.”

Image 2: “Kathryn who’s playing my double who’s incredible.”

[ Orphan Black's Tatiana Maslany on her acting double, Kathryn Alexandre, two images from a set on themarysue, via lifeofkj ]

image image

image image

I’ve got a relationship that goes back many, many years with Dave. And I would hate for people to just see that image of me and Dave and go, “oh, there’s Dan Radcliffe with a person in a wheelchair.” Because I would never even for a moment want them to assume that Dave was anything except for an incredibly important person in my life.

[ Daniel Radcliffe talking about David Holmes, his stunt double for 2001-2009, who was paralysed while working on the Harry Potter films. David Holmes relates his story here. Gifset via smeagoled ]

With modern tv- and film-making techniques, many characters are composite creations. The characters we see onscreen or onstage have always been team efforts, with writers, directors, makeup artists, costume designers, special effects artists, production designers, and many other people all contributing to how a character is ultimately realized in front of us. Many different techniques go into something like the creation of Skinny Steve — he’s no more all Leander Deeny than he is all Chris Evans.

But as fandom dissects the anatomy of scenes in ever-increasing detail to get at microexpressions and the minutiae of body language, let’s recognize the anatomy in the scenes, too. I don’t mean to take away from the work Chris Evans or any other actors do (he is an amazing Steve Rogers and I love him tons), but fandom needs to do better in recognizing the bodies, the other people, who make up the characters we love and some of our very favourite shots of them. Chris Evans has an amazing body, but so does Leander Deeny — that body is beautiful; that body mimicked Chris Evans’s motions with amazing, skilled precision; that body moved Steve Rogers with emotion and grace and character.

Fandom should do better than productions and creators who fail to be transparent about the doubles in their productions. On the screen, suspension of disbelief is key and the goal is to make all the effort that went into the production vanish and leave only the product itself behind. But when the film is over and the episode ends, let’s remember everyone who helped make that happen.

image

[ Sam Hargrave (stunt double for Chris Evans) and James Young (stunt double for Sebastian Stan, and fight choreographer), seen from behind, exchange a fistbump while in costume on the set of Captain America: The Winter Soldier. Image via lifeofkj ]

I applaud these guys as much as the suit actors in my japanese tokusatsu shows. They do just as much work. 

(Source: stark-industries-rnd, via ikeracity)

Guys, help, is this too much boob? Because it’s super cute but I don’t want to make it trashy because I have too much chest. Also, no bra, because I own nothing strapless.

Guys, help, is this too much boob? Because it’s super cute but I don’t want to make it trashy because I have too much chest. Also, no bra, because I own nothing strapless.

Still not dead and looking fabulous if I do say so myself.

Still not dead and looking fabulous if I do say so myself.

Tags: photo

Not dead yet post

quitecrazy:

I’m pretty sure that if I advertised that I love museums and can get into them for free my calendar wouldn’t be so empty. People like going to museums, right?

Dude, another playdate would be awesome. I haven’t seen you in forever~ and I’ve been fairly regularly going into Boston lately.

laffbending:

kissingcullens:

But Nick Fury.

The thing is, even though the film arcs toward openness and transparency (which is amazing in itself) Fury is portrayed as intelligent, thoughtful, righteous, and very correct in his beliefs too——

Steve and Nick Fury have a tense relationship: they argue, Steve gets angry with him, is critical of his style of leadership: they bump heads over Steve’s belief in openness and trust, and Nick’s reliance on compartmentalization and pragmatism.

 True, he is shown to be wrong about his support for preemptive technology and weaponization (in CATWS and in Avengers) but he’s justified in his reasoning for his beliefs; ESPECIALLY his reluctance to place trust in any one person.  

Both he and Steve are right: Natasha having a seperate mission made Steve’s job difficult, but trusting the big picture to any one person is dangerous; and Fury’s pragmatism ends up saving the day when he reveals he had a backup plan all along.  (scanning his bad eye)

Fury’s monologue to a thoughtful Steve in the elevator is a really great moment: it sums up his ethos (a bag filled with money and a gun) and gives background for his beliefs and his outlook.  

People have talked about the racial profiling-esque moment with Nick and the cops, but I thought the subtle mention that Nick Fury’s grandfather was a bellhop who lived in a rough neighborhood and had to get rough back was a really great touch that spoke to his perspective as a black man in America.

We know that Fury is a “grey” character: someone who withholds information, lies, and keeps secrets, but what I think is SO AMAZING is that one little scene where, even after knocking heads with Fury the entire movie, and being totally at odds with him- after storming out in anger after denouncing the insight project: Steve still rejects the idea that Fury would be evil or secretly aligned with evildoers.

It’s when he’s talking to Redford, who’s trying to plant the seed of doubt in his mind about Fury.
I think the line is something like “If you knew Nick Fury, you wouldn’t say that.”

Steve has no idea which way is up at this point in the movie: he’s confused, unsure of his allies and his enemies; Nick himself said not to trust ANYONE, and jfc he just found out his neighbor was an undercover agent.

But Steve BELIEVES IN NICK FURY.  He believes in this man whom he trusts enough to argue with and defy candidly.
 This man may make decisions Steve abhors, but ultimately, he knows where Nick stands.  

(via cluelessnu)